The body became a bed of flowers

Posted: August 27, 2010 in Uncategorized

The tale of what happened to Kabir (1440-1518) after his death is known by every child in India. His remains were claimed by both Muslim and Hindus in his hometown of Banar in north India.

One side wanted to cremate him and scatter his ashes in a holy place. The other side wanted to bury him.

The dispute over Kabir’s remains escalated. Armed conflict appeared to be imminent as no peaceful solution was on the negotiating table.

The Hindu and Muslim disciples saw Kabir appear to them in a dream where he told his followers of both religions to open his casket. They did as instructed. Upon opening the casket Kabir’s body had changed into a bed of flowers.

One faction took half of the fragrant flowers and cremated them.

The other faction buried the remaining half.

Both sides were ecstatic.

I cherish Kabir’s love poetry:

From Seeking: Why run around sprinkling holy water?

There’s an ocean inside you, and when you’re ready,

You’ll drink.

Merging: A drop melting into the ocean—

That you can see.

The ocean melting into a drop—

Who sees that?

Excerpt from The Answer: An empty cup

That overflows

The Sorrow-less Land: Following a path that couldn’t be followed

I came to the Sorrow-less Land

The mercy of the Lord was upon me.

Though he is called unattainable,

I saw him without sight.

Excerpt from Bliss: You will find your existence

In the land of Bliss.

No One Can Tell Me: A bird is dancing with the joy of life.

Where did it come from? No one can tell me.

What is it singing? No one can say.

It nests in the dark

Where the deep shade is thrown,

Coming at evening, departing at dawn,

Giving no clue to whatever it means.

I can’t find out why this bird

Sits inside me.

On the branch of the Eternal—

Untouched by all—

In the shadow of love.

Courtesy of Deepak Chopra, The Soul In Love—classic poems of ecstasy and excitation, Harmony Books, New York, 2001.

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Comments
  1. Lee Evanz says:

    Great! Love it. Thanks.

  2. panisala says:

    I didn’t know who this guy was and didn’t know if the stoy about his body becoming a bed of flower was true…but I love his poems.

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